D
Slang for "discussion"; e.g., "How many D's did you teach this week, Elders?"

See also discussions, the.
 
d.a.
See dinner appointment.
 
D & C
See Doctrine and Covenants.
 
"Dear Jane"
A gender-reversed "Dear John" letter.
 
"Dear John"
A letter to a missionary from his significant other, informing him that she has failed to successfully wait. Often accompanied by a wedding announcement linking the significant other with one of the missionary's former companions.

See also "Dear Jane."
 
die
In mission parlance, to be released from one's mission and return home; e.g., "I hope I die here in Babylonville, Elder. I'd hate to have to adjust to a whole new area before going home."

Derived by analogy with the process in Mormon theology whereby spirits leave their premortal existence, are born physically and die on earth, then return to the spirit realm to await resurrection and judgment.
 
dinner appointment
An occasion when a member family invites the local missionaries over for dinner.

The Church encourages this activity because a) it gives the missionaries a chance to remind the members that they should be introducing non-members of their acquaintance to the Restored Gospel, and b) it assures the missionaries of nutritious hot meals on occasion.

Some missionaries are more zealous about pursuing dinner appointments than about pursuing actual converts.
 
discussion
A lesson taught by missionaries to an investigator. So named, I believe, so as to minimize in investigators the feeling of being taught a rote catechetical sermon by inviting dialogue and greater back-and-forth participation.

The current curriculum for prospective members includes six discussions, each about an hour in length, which cover the very most basic tenets of the Restored Gospel. Each discussion consists of several principles, which the missionaries are free to put across in their own words, adapting to the necessities of the situation. Companions usually take turns teaching principles.

Most discussions end with an invitation to baptism. Most invitations to baptism end with a shake of the head.

See also discussions, the.
 
discussions, the
A term applied broadly to the set of six missionary discussions, or to the process of teaching them to an investigator; e.g., "Brother Bundy is taking the discussions for the seventh time now."
 
district
A geographical area consisting usually of two to four companionships, encompassing from four to eight missionaries and supervised by a district leader.

See also zone.
 
district activity
A recreational activity designed to strengthen bonds of friendship, community, and purpose between the members of a district.

Also, an excuse for goofing around.

Contrast district meeting.

See also zone activity.
 
district leader
A missionary assigned to supervise usually two to four companionships, encompassing from four to eight other missionaries.

Often shortened to d.l.

See also zone leader.
 
district meeting
A weekly meeting at which the members of a district convene to report on their achievements of the past week, set performance goals for the next week, practice their teaching skills, and decide on someplace cool to go for lunch.

Also, an excuse for goofing around.

Contrast district activity.
 
Doctrine and Covenants
A collection of purportedly divine revelations received primarily by Joseph Smith, though other latter-day prophets are also represented. One of the four canonized works of Mormon scripture.

Often shortened to D & C -- though the irony of calling a book of scripture by the common initials for "dilation and curettage" seems not to occur to most Mormons.
 
double-digit midget
Mission slang for a missionary with less than a hundred days of service remaining.
 
Dum Dum
Dum Dum
A dim-witted Hanna-Barbera cartoon dog. Sidekick to Touché Turtle.
 
dunk
Mission parlance for baptism. Can be used as either a noun or a verb; e.g., "How many dunks have you scored this month, Elder? Are you going to dunk anyone else before the month is over?"

So derived because Mormons baptize by total immersion.
 

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